Toronto International Film Festival

Nightcrawler Movie

Nightcrawler

Nighttime vultures circling around the cynical, cruel world of newsworthy accidents and tragedies are depicted with delectably compelling malice in Dan Gilroy’s directorial debut, Nightcrawler. Hitting home runs with feature debuts seems to run in the Gilroy family, with older brother Tony’s excellent Michael Clayton coming out of the woodwork in 2007. With his own Read More
‘Force Majeure’ Director Ruben Östlund Wants Viewers Horrified AND Laughing Interview

‘Force Majeure’ Director Ruben Östlund Wants Viewers Horrified AND Laughing

We interview Force Majeure director, Ruben Östlund on his tragic comedy sensibilities. Read More
A Pigeon Sat On A Branch Reflecting On Existence (TIFF Review) Movie

A Pigeon Sat On A Branch Reflecting On Existence (TIFF Review)

The auteur label is becoming more and more of a taboo, since it implies a belittling attitude towards the hundreds of people working on a given film. In this way, Swedish maestro Roy Andersson is something of a relic; while his movies must be meticulously crafted by hundreds of participants, it’s his inimitable vision that perseveres. Read More
Miss Julie (TIFF Review) Movie

Miss Julie (TIFF Review)

With filming wrapped all the way back in 2013, it almost feels like Liv Ullmann’s grand return behind the camera has come a year too late. While this can mess with people’s anxieties and expectations; the most important thing is that Ullmann is back, directing an adaptation of masterpiece Swedish play Miss Julie by August Read More
Way Too Indiecast 4: Darlings and Busts of TIFF 2014, Festival Wrap-up Podcasts

Way Too Indiecast 4: Darlings and Busts of TIFF 2014, Festival Wrap-up

Podcast: Play in new window | Download Now that TIFF 2014 is officially over and we’ve caught our breath from festival fatigue, we discuss our favorite films from the festival as well as some of the duds we saw. Also during this special TIFF edition of the Way Too Indiecast, we highlight a few titles Read More
Laggies (TIFF Review) Movie

Laggies (TIFF Review)

Coming off a disappointing previous film (Touchy Feely), director Lynn Shelton returns with Laggies to what she does best —examining likable but flawed characters at a crossroads in their life. Working from a script she didn’t write (a first for the director) and her largest budget to date, Shelton ditches her typical improvisational approach for a Read More
Spring (TIFF Review) Movie

Spring (TIFF Review)

For their follow-up to Resolution, Justin Benson and Aaron S. Moorhead ditch the meta qualities of their debut feature for straight storytelling in Spring. Their film opens with Evan (Lou Taylor Pucci) watching his mother succumb to cancer while taking care of her. A bar cook with only one friend in town, and now one Read More
‘Heaven Knows What’ Talent On How All Movies are Documentaries & Working with First-Time Actors Interview

‘Heaven Knows What’ Talent On How All Movies are Documentaries & Working with First-Time Actors

The story behind indie filmmakers Josh and Benny Safdie’s Heaven Knows What is simply fascinating (read our review). While researching a completely different project, the siblings unintentionally met a woman named Arielle Holmes, who they discovered lives a pretty interesting life on the streets of New York City. So they convinced her to write a Read More
TIFF 2014: From What is Before Film Festival

TIFF 2014: From What is Before

Every time something gets written about Lav Diaz, an explanation of the director’s unusual, tough filmography feels necessary. When it comes to length, Diaz is one of the most maximal directors around. It says something when Diaz’s last film, the 4 hour Norte, the End of History, is one of his shortest works. From What Read More
Best and Worst Films of TIFF 2014 Features

Best and Worst Films of TIFF 2014

With Toronto now in our rearview mirror, we’ve had time to reflect on which films at the festivals left the greatest impression on us as well as ones that left us with a bad taste (check out our coverage hub). Unlike last year’s 12 Years a Slave or Gravity, the lineup this year seemed to Read More
Jonas Govaerts on Debuting ‘Cub’ at TIFF & Casting Kids for Horror Interview

Jonas Govaerts on Debuting ‘Cub’ at TIFF & Casting Kids for Horror

“The traps were like Goonies gone horror,” explained Belgian director Jonas Govaerts. Only blocks away from the theater where his debut feature Cub would soon premiere, Govaerts was easy-going but likely ready for his movie to finally screen for audiences. “It’s daunting,” he said of being at the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival with his Read More
TIFF 2014: Goodbye to Language 3D Film Festival

TIFF 2014: Goodbye to Language 3D

Like the film’s 70 minute runtime, I’ll be brief. Jean-Luc Godard tackles three dimensions in his latest film, a complete sensory assault that, like his other recent works, can only be attributed to the legendary filmmaker. Narrative and characters don’t truly matter here; something one character explicitly states at one point. There are two couples Read More
Tu Dors Nicole (TIFF Review) Movie

Tu Dors Nicole (TIFF Review)

Stephane Lafleur’s Tu Dors Nicole (literally translated to “You’re sleeping, Nicole”) takes place over one languid, youthful summer, shot gorgeously on black and white 35mm film. The 22-year-old title character (Julianne Côté), does nothing but aimlessly wander the neighborhood when not working at a thrift store, looking forward to summertime. With her parents away on Read More
TIFF 2014: Gett, The Trial of Viviane Amsalem Film Festival

TIFF 2014: Gett, The Trial of Viviane Amsalem

In Gett, The Trial of Viviane Amsalem, the title character (played by co-director Ronit Elkabetz) spends 5 years trying to divorce her husband Elisha (Simon Abkarian). In Israel, divorce cases are only handled by the Rabbinical Court, and religious laws state the husband must approve the divorce in order for it to be final. Elisha Read More
TIFF 2014: The Look of Silence Film Festival

TIFF 2014: The Look of Silence

After making The Act of Killing, Joshua Oppenheimer goes back to the same subject matter for his follow-up The Look of Silence. A brief background: In The Act of Killing, Joshua Oppenheimer followed several people responsible for slaughtering hundreds, if not thousands, of suspected communists in the 1960s military coup of Indonesia. Oppenheimer was shocked Read More